1/24/11

Recent Major Gifts Strengthen Science Programs

A generous gift by Harlan Fulmer, M.D. '43 and his wife M. Eleanor (Kern) Fulmer will benefit Moravian students for generations to come. Photo courtesy of Rev. Ken Fulmer '45

Two gifts made in recent months will have a profound, and long-lasting impact on the Moravian science programs and students.

"The combined addition of $3 million in endowed scholarship funds for science majors is a testimony to the strength of the College's science departments," said President Christopher Thomforde. The College will be the recipient of a major gift from the estate of Harlan Fulmer, M.D. '43, who passed away September 2, 2010, and his wife M. Eleanor (Kern) Fulmer, who predeceased him. The $5 million bequest is one of the largest single gifts that the College has ever received.

Dr. Fulmer's bequest directs that 50 percent of the gift be added to the Harlan F. Fulmer M.D. and Eleanor Fulmer Scholarship fund for pre-med, pre-dental, and nursing students. The remaining 50 percent is to be added to the College general endowment. Earnings from the addition to the endowment will help support the Collier Hall of Science project. "The College is most grateful to Dr. Fulmer for his remarkable generosity," said President Thomforde. "A gift like his will directly benefit the lives of our students for generations to come."

After graduating from Moravian, Dr. Fulmer completed his graduate medical studies at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia, then enjoyed a long career as a pathologist in Fresno, California.


"The addition of $3 million in endowed scholarship funds for science majors is a testimony to the strength of the College's science departments," said President Christopher Thomforde.


In addition to Dr. Fulmer's gift, Moravian has received a gift of $500,000 from James Molnar '66 toward the Stuart S. Kulp Scholarship, which benefits chemistry majors. The fund was originally established in 1992 by Bryan W. Sandmann '86 and Frank J. Szarko, M.D. '61 and Carol J.Herman Szarko, M.D. '62. The scholarship is awarded to a junior or senior chemistry major who plans to pursue a career in chemistry. The recipients are selected by the chemistry faculty members "in recognition of superior achievement and potential to contribute to the field of chemistry."

Molnar received a Ph.D. in organic chemistry, after graduating from Moravian in 1966. "On of the main reasons he selected Lehigh for his Ph.D. work was that it was the doctoral alma mater of Stuart Kulp, Jim's favorite Moravian professor," noted Lehigh chemistry professor Ned Heindel, who is also the spouse of Moravian emeriti professor Linda Heindel. "Because of his intense training under Kulp, Jim was not only ready for the creative side of chemistry graduate work but was extraordinarily skilled at doing it."

Jim Molnar went on to work as a forensic chemist at the FBI Crime Lab, and was part of a team that developed simple assays that could be used by field agents on drug busts to establish on site whether a confiscated powder was an illegal drug or a harmless powder.