Inside Moravian
e-Newsletter of the Moravian College Campus Community 12/3/13
This file photo shows attendees looking at clothing items and weapons from the Medieval timeperiod.
 

ABOVE: Moravian College will host the eighth annual Undergraduate Conference in Medieval and Early Modern Studies on Saturday, Dec. 7, drawing students and others from throughout the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic.

 
 

Indulge in Medieval & Early Modern Studies at Dec. 7 Conference

Students to Discuss Literature, Arts & History on Campus

By Alyssa D’Ippolito ’15

The eighth annual Undergraduate Conference in Medieval and Early Modern Studies will soon be under way, showcasing a range of activities on the Moravian College campus as well as at Trinity Episcopal Church in Bethlehem.

The conference provides students who are interested in this period, whether their concentration is in art, history or literature, a chance to take their studies and research out of the classroom and present their findings to others who have a shared affinity for medieval and early modern studies.

All of the Lehigh Valley Association of Independent Colleges (LVIAC) are invited to participate in the conference, which is set for Saturday, Dec. 7. Many participants also come from throughout the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic. Additionally, the public is welcome to attend and enjoy the event, which opens with registration on campus at 8:30 a.m. followed by opening remarks from Jim Skalnik, assistant dean for academic advising at Moravian, at 9:15 a.m. Online registration is recommended.

“The conference is a lot of fun because it brings people together from not only various departments and offices, but from off campus as well,” said John Black, associate professor of English. “We see it as a way for students to showcase their work and receive feedback from the public.” Black has teamed with Sandra Bardsley, associate professor of history, to coordinate the conference since its inception in 2006. It was the first such event in the United States to specialize in medieval and early modern studies. 

While the conference is meant to be fairly casual, it is still molded after professional presentations. Students participating can expect to benefit through improved public speaking and even networking opportunities.

“It is important that we come to both support these students who have come from all over and to learn more about medieval and early modern studies in general.”

– Corey Puia ’14


There are four paper sessions built into the conference with a short break for lunch. A mid-day plenary session, led by Tracey-Anne Cooper of St. John’s University and Christine Senecal of Shippensburg University, will discuss “Medieval Representations of Women Warriors and Female Aggression.” The session will begin at 12:50 p.m. in the HUB’s Prosser Auditorium.

This event will be followed by art history exhibits, calligraphy and even weaving presentations.
At 5 p.m., Trinity Episcopal Church will host a “Performance of Medieval and Early Modern Music: Flute and Lute,” featuring the Renaissance versions of several familiar holiday songs. The church is located at 44 E. Market Street in Bethlehem.

“I think that it is awesome to see such an interest in medieval studies,” said Corey Puia ’14. “It is important that we come to both support these students who have come from all over and to learn more about medieval and early modern studies in general.”

Attendees are welcome to stay for the entire conference or, depending on their interests and schedule, pick and choose what sessions to partake in. In years past, the conference has drawn approximately 200 people. Volunteers are always in abundance as well.

“Each year we have a call of volunteers for the conference and we have many volunteers who help moderate panels or do technical work. We even have students involved and helping who aren’t presenting,” said Black.

Black concluded that the conference wouldn’t be possible without the generous support from LVIAC, volunteers, students and staff.

For more information, visit the conference’s website, www.moravian.edu/medieval/.

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