Skip to main content
Moravian College
English

Fall 2017 Courses

The following courses are offered during the Fall 2017 semester. Please view the Moravian College Course Catalog for a complete listing of English Department course offerings.

100-Level Courses

English 101A: American Literature: Roots and Routes 

This course is an introduction to the development of the American literary heritage, with emphasis on analytical, written, and oral skills. We will focus on works that either remain deeply rooted in one place or chart routes to new destinations. In addition to considering why some writers and characters prefer the comforts (or challenges) of home while others are lured (or forced) to go on the road, we will also explore tensions between region and nation throughout American literature. LinC M2 course. Crooke

English 102A: British Literature: Truth and Beauty 

How have writers shared their perceptions on the human condition in literary works ranging from Beowulf, epic story of a hero, to modern expressions of love, loss, frustration, and ambition? This course provides an introduction to distinctive British works, emphasizing analytical and communication skills, and celebrating the ways in which literature of various eras and genres appeals to the human mind and heart. LinC M2 course. Dougal

English 102B: British Literature: Texts and Contexts

Introduction to distinctive British works, emphasizing analytical and communication skills. LinC M2 course. Adams Osborn

English 104A: The Experience of Literature: Acts of Defiance in Women's Literature

This course is a broad overview of literature written by women over the last century and a half. Readings include major literary genres such as novels, short stories, poetry, drama, essays, graphic novels, and memoirs spanning a variety of times and cultures. Students will develop critical thinking and analytical skills through readings and class discussion, and will demonstrate those skills through written and oral projects. LinC M2 course. Mikovits

English 104B: The Experience of Literature: Sexuality and Gender in "Africa"

How do we talk about sexuality and gender in the context of “Africa”? On the one hand, many Black communities throughout the world often look back to Africa for examples of how to live sexual and gendered lives. On the other hand, many American and European queer and feminist scholars and individuals often look to Africa as an example of how not to think about these terms. But how do Africans, themselves, think about and live what we call “sexuality” and “gender”? This course seeks answers to these questions.

Through a combination of literary texts (i.e., novels, short stories, and films), cultural texts (i.e., scholarly articles, newspaper articles, etc.), and historical and legal documents from various African nations (with particular emphases on Nigeria, Uganda, and South Africa), we will work towards a better understanding of what ideas of sexuality and gender look like throughout Africa. Beginning with the question, “How do we speak of sexuality and gender in the context of ‘Africa’?,” we will move towards the question, “How do Africans think and talk about sexuality and gender?” In examining these questions, we will begin developing answers to the question, “What can ‘African’ notions of sexuality and gender teach us about our own interpretations of these terms and their lived experiences?” LinC M2 course. LaRue

English 105: African American Literature: Race, Gender, and Resistance

This course introduces students to African American Studies through various depictions of the lived experiences of African Americans. These depictions emerge in historical discourses, art, language, literature, cultural studies, film, music, poetry, and drama. This course outlines the various subjects of African American Studies through the historical, literary, aural, and oral texts that reflect the culture of Black folk in the United States. (Also an Africana Studies minor course.) LinC M2 course. Waller-Peterson

200-Level Courses

English 212: Introduction to Creative Writing

Guided practice in poetry, creative nonfiction, and fiction. Prerequisites: Writing 100 or LINC 101, and permission of instructor. LinC M6 course. Joella

English 225: Introduction to English Studies

Introduction to various aspects of the discipline, including analysis of literature, bibliographic and research techniques, critical thinking and writing, various literary approaches, literary theory, and history of the field. Closed to non-English majors except by written permission of department chair or instructor. Writing intensive. Strongly encouraged as a pre-requisite for upper-level ENGL courses. Tabor

English 230: Public Speaking

Basic theory of public speaking with emphasis on developing skills essential to effective interpersonal communication in industrial, business, and academic settings. Ward

English 233: Modern Drama and Theater

Development of dramatic literature and theatrical practice in the 20th century. Tabor

English 240: Post-Colonial Literature

Introduction to literature produced by 20th-century African, Asian, and Caribbean writers from former colonies of Western European empires, especially Britain. LinC M5 Course. LaRue

English 263: Writing as Activism

To what can extent can, or should, writing (and also reading) function as a kind of activism? Can written work change minds and hearts? Should it be designed to do so? Can writing be more than a hobby--but also more than a vocation? That is, can the acts of writing and reading be seen as moral acts, as part of living a fully engaged life? In this course we will examine these and other questions as we read, view, discuss, and emulate both factual/documentary and imaginative works (ranging from op-ed pieces and documentaries to poems and short stories). Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. LinC U2 course. Hinnefeld

English 288: Internship

Practical field experience in writing for mass media, business, industry, or nonprofits. Designed in consultation with director of internship program and field supervisor. By arrangement. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing; 200-level writing course approved by the English major advisor or English Department Chair. Hinnefeld

English 290: Digital Rhetoric and Writing

This writing intensive course asks students to rhetorically analyze established and emerging digital genres in order to gain the theoretical and practical background necessary to approach the production of writing for digital platforms. Prerequisite: LinC 101 or equivalent. Fodrey

English 295: Literature and the Medical Humanities: Perspectives on Illness and Healing

Lucille Clifton states, “I don’t write because I have a mission to heal the world. My mission is to heal Lucille if I can, as much as I can.” Writing offers Clifton a medium through which she can enact a form of healing and self-preservation. Similarly, illness narratives communicate the embodied and disembodied experiences of people living with sickness, disease, and illness in an effort to make sense of their changing bodies, lives, and identities. This reading intensive course explores health, wellness, and illness narratives through a sustained engagement with non-fiction and imaginary literature. Prerequisite: LinC 101 or equivalent plus junior or senior class standing. Linc U1 course. Waller-Peterson

English 296: Introduction to Writing Arts

Students explore foundational concepts in writing arts in order to understand writing as both a subject of study and a significant symbolic activity in our everyday lives. Topics include key tenets of rhetoric and poetics and the functions of writing in various contexts; the role of writing in shaping various academic, creative, public, and professional communities; the development of writing abilities; and the role of technological advancements on the changing character of writing. Prerequisite: LinC 101 or equivalent. Fodrey

English 297: Introduction to Journalism

An integrative journalism course in which students will learn how to write, edit, pitch and publish news and features for a variety of media outlets; taught by an active media professional, with assistance and resources from Moravian's David Zinczenko Center for Integrative Media. Prerequisites: Sophomore class standing; B or higher in LINC 101 or Writing 100 (or equivalent). Alu

300-Level Courses

English 340: American Literature 1800–1865

A study of the range of literary voices that constitute "American literature" from 1800-1865, including works by Native and African Americans, Hispanics, women, and a variety of ethnic and minority groups, as well as by the better-known writers of the era—Irving, Emerson, Thoreau, Dickinson, Hawthorne, Poe, Melville, and Whitman. Prerequisite: ENGL 225 or permission of instructor. Dougal

English 343: American Fiction after World War 2

Works since 1950, with emphasis on living authors. Prerequisite: ENGL 225 or permission of instructor. LaRue

English 354: 20th Century British Literature

British and Irish poets and novelists, with some emphasis on writers who have gained recognition since World War II. Prerequisite: ENGL 225 or permission of instructor. Tabor

English 371: Senior Seminar

This course will synthesize and expand upon what students have learned throughout their major. Weekly meetings will consist of readings, discussion, and writing on topics within English Studies. Course requirements will include an extended written work in a student’s chosen genre, as well as a portfolio. Prerequisite: ENGL 225 or permission of instructor. Dougal

English 386: Internship

Practical field experience in writing for mass media, business, industry, or nonprofits. Designed in consultation with director of internship program and field supervisor. By arrangement. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing; 200-level writing course approved by the English major advisor or English Department Chair; plus one additional English course. Hinnefeld

English 391: Writing as Activism

To what can extent can, or should, writing (and also reading) function as a kind of activism? Can written work change minds and hearts? Should it be designed to do so? Can writing be more than a hobby--but also more than a vocation? That is, can the acts of writing and reading be seen as moral acts, as part of living a fully engaged life? In this course we will examine these and other questions as we read, view, discuss, and emulate both factual/documentary and imaginative works (ranging from op-ed pieces and documentaries to poems and short stories).

Students taking this course at the 300 level will be required to complete additional assignments, such as a written or multimodal text for consideration for publication by a non-College print or media outlet, and a written or multimodal text in support of the work of a local or regional nonprofit organization or approved Moravian College organization. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing; ENGL 211, 212, or another 200-level writing course approved by the English Department Chair. Hinnefeld