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Comenius Hall
History

Nicholas Creary

Nick Creary

Office: PPHAC 214
Office Phone: 610-625-7884
Email: crearyn@moravian.edu 

Education

  • B.A., Georgetown University
  • M.A., The Catholic University of America
  • Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Teaching: I offer courses in African and African American histories. 

Current Research: My most recent books, South African Literary Cultural Nationalism-Abalobi beSizwe eMzansi - 1918-45: Returning to the Source (Cambridge Scholars Publishing), is a theoretical reflection on the history and nature of the interactions between sub-Saharan Africa and Europe from 1341 to the present that builds on research comparing literary cultural nationalist movements among Africans and peoples of African descent in the Atlantic world during the first half of the 20th century.

Selected Publications

Books:

  • South African Literary Cultural Nationalism-Abalobi beSizwe eMzanski - 1918-45: Returning to the Source. New Castle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2018. 
  • African Intellectuals and Decolonization. Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 2012.
  • Domesticating a Religious Import: Inculturating the Catholic Church at Jesuit Missions in Zimbabwe, 1879-1980. Bronx, NY: Fordham University Press, 2011.

Articles and Chapters:

  • "'The Demands of Humanity and Religion': The U.S. Catholic Church, Colonization, and the Missions to Liberia, 1842-1844," Catholic Historical Review, 100/1 (January 2014), 165-189.
  • "'Speaking the Language of Protest': African Student Rebellions at the Catholic Major Seminary in Colonial Zimbabwe, 1965-1979," in 1968 in the Third World, Samantha Christiansen & Zachary Scarlett, eds., (New York: Berghahn Books, 2013), 116-132. 
  • "Times of Lamentation: Rethinking Periodization in African History," Atenea: A Bilingual Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences, 30/1-2 (2010), 107-117.
  • "'Hath not a Mochuana Eyes?': Investigating BaTswana Cultural Sources of Sol Plaatje's Mhudi," Journal of the African Literature Association, 2/2 (Summer/Fall 2008), 58-76.