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Mathematics

Mathematics Events

Join the mathematics community for some exciting events this semester! Everyone is invited to participate. 


Upcoming Events

Creating Math Lessons with Desmos

Free Virtual Professional Development for Moravian College students interested in Math Education and recent Moravian College alumni interested in Math Education

 

Presented by Leigh Nataro, Mathematics Lecturer at Moravian College and Desmos Certified Presenter

 

Level Up your Desmos Calculator Skills (Tuesday, March 30 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM)

In this session you will learn about various ways the Desmos graphing calculator can be used to help students explore various types of functions and relationships between graphs, algebraic representations and tables. The Desmos matrix calculator and Geometry calculator will be showcased and participants will have the opportunity to level up their own skills with a scavenger hunt.

 

Using Desmos Activity Builder Lessons (Tuesday, April 13  6:30 - 8:00 PM)

In this session you will experience Desmos Activity Builder lessons from the student perspective and see how you can use the various features of the teacher dashboard to leverage student thinking, promote a growth mindset and encourage mathematical exploration.  Features of anonymize, pausing, pacing, snapshots and feedback will be reviewed.

 

Building Your Own Desmos Activity Builder Lessons (Tuesday, April 27 6:30 - 8:00 PM)

In this session you learn how to modify existing Desmos Activity Builder lessons and create your own. By the end of this session, you will create an exit ticket activity to use with your students. In addition, we will explore existing collections of activities and you will start curating your own collection of activities.

 

Note: All sessions will be recorded.  Please express your interest in attending on this google form.

 

** If you are unable to make the scheduled time please email math@moravian.edu so that we can accommodate you and meet your needs. **

 

Instructional Strategies to Promote Reasoning and Communication in Statistics

Sidney Leigh Nataro, Lecturer of Statistics at Moravian College, will be giving a talk at the NCTM 2021 Virtual Meeting.  More information to come.

Date of Talk: May 1, 2021

Description:  Reasoning and communicating in statistics can be challenging for any student. For a variety of reasons, students are often unwilling to share their ideas in front of their peers as they are learning new concepts. The instructional strategies presented in this session will help all students to become better at communicating verbally and in writing about statistics concepts, leading to a culture of collaboration where mistakes are valued as part of the learning process.  Come experience several instructional strategies based on the AP Statistics Course and Exam Description, including build the model solution, stand and talk, error analysis, and peer critique.  

 

Colloquium: by Dr. Reginald McGee from College of the Holy Cross

Wednesday, March 17 - 4pm

Below is the Zoom info for the talk: 

https://moravian.zoom.us/j/92225899698?pwd=cDdXdlhmRG4vYXVPcXdibFRnbEtUdz09
Meeting ID: 922 2589 9698
Passcode: DrMcGee

Title: Singled Out: Analyzing single-cell data to identify signaling interactions in leukemia

Abstract: Complex protein interaction networks complicate the understanding of what most promotes the rate of cancer progression. High dimensional data provides opportunities for new insights into possible mechanisms for the proliferative nature of aggressive cancers, but these datasets often require fresh techniques and ideas for exploration and analysis. In this talk, we consider mass cytometry data capturing expression levels of tens of biomarkers in individual cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients. After identifying immune cell subpopulations in this data using an established clustering method, we present a novel statistic for testing differential biomarker correlations across patients and within specific cell phenotypes.

 

 


Recent Events

Colloquium: by Dr. Murong Xu from Univ. of Scranton

Tuesday, February 23⋅4:00 – 5:00pm

Virtual

Title: "A new clustering method and its application"

Cluster analysis or clustering is the process of segmenting a collection of objects into subsets
or “clusters” such that objects within each cluster are more closely related to one another than
those assigned to different clusters. An object can be described by a set of measurements, or by its
relation to other objects. In addition, the goal is sometimes to arrange the clusters into a natural
hierarchy. This involves successively grouping the clusters themselves so that at each level of the
hierarchy, clusters within the same group are more similar to each other than those in different
groups. Clustering is a common unsupervised learning algorithm for statistical classification.
From the perspective of graph models, clusters are the “dense” subgraphs of a graph. Based on
such understanding, we proposed a new clustering method, which generates a hierarchy that has
a clear clustering structure. The new clustering method stands out due to its ability to include
overlapping members within clusters. In this talk, this new clustering method will be introduced
and its application in social networks and neural networks will be discussed.

 

Patterns in Permutations

When: Saturday, February 13, 2021 at  9 a.m.
Where: virtual (link on "Schedule of Talks")

Please join the PME Mathematics Honor Society for the Student Mathematics Conference and guest speaker, Dr. Lara K. Pudwell, Associate Professor of Mathematics and Statistics from Valparaiso University

Abstract: A permutation is a list of numbers where order matters. While it is well-known that there are n! ways to put n different numbers in order, there are a variety of follow-up research topics, especially when we study permutations that have specific properties.  In this talk, we will focus on permutation patterns -- that is, smaller permutations contained inside of larger permutations. From a pure mathematics perspective, permutation patterns lead to a variety of interesting counting problems. Looking further afield, we will see how permutations with zero copies of a given pattern arise naturally in computer science, and we will consider a situation where packing as many copies as possible of a pattern into permutations has a surprising connection to physical chemistry.

View the "Schedule of Talks" here.

Antimicrobial Resistance Epidemiology and Applied Mathematics

November 19, 2020 virtual

Guest Speaker: Dr. Casey Cazer, DVM, PhD from Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine

Please join the the Mathematics Department for a Colloquium featuring Casey Cazer.

 

Disease management and its reliance on statistical theory

October 27, 2020 virtual

Guest Speaker:Dr. Karyn Havas,DVM, PhD(epidemiology), MS (economics) from Cornell University

Please join the the Mathematics Department for a Colloquium featuring Karyn Havas.

 

Origami-Mathematics: How to fold paper, polymers, and robots

When: Saturday, February 22, 2020 at 9 a.m.
Where: Sally, First Floor

Please join the PME Mathematics Honor Society for the Student Mathematics Conference and guest speaker, Dr. Thomas Hull from Western New England University.

Analyzing the analyzers: understanding variability in forensic decision-making

When: Tuesday, February 18, 2020  from 12 p.m.–1 p.m.
Where: Sally 106

Guest Speaker: Amanda Luby, Assistant Professor of Statistics at Swarthmore College

Please join the Mathematics Department for a Colloquium featuring Amanda Luby.

Blowing Our Minds Using Bubbles to Visualize the 4th Dimension!

When: Wednesday, February 12, 2020 at 4:30 p.m.
Where: Sally, Conference Room #335

By: Dr. Trisha Moller

Come help Finn and Jake (and Dr. Moller) explore the dimensions using knowledge about shadows or projections. We will investigate the characteristics of dimensional shapes and develop patterns to form a hypothesis.  We test out theories by creating our own tesseract (or hypercube) using bubbles. "It's beyond comprehension!" It will blow your mind.