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Moravian University
Psychology
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Aleena Hay

Assistant Professor of Psychology (2019)

Education

  • B.A., Skidmore College
  • Ph.D., Yale University 

Contact

Email: haya02@moravian.edu
Phone: 610-861-1565 
Office: PPHAC, Room 227

Areas of Research and/or Expertise

Dr. Hay’s research focuses on understanding basic interpersonal emotion regulation processes – i.e., how we manage our emotions with the help of others - and how these processes go awry in individuals with anxiety and mood disorders. The long-term aims of her work are to identify novel treatment targets and explore basic processes involved in interpersonal emotion regulation. By better understanding how emotion regulation processes work typically, we can better understand the ways in which they may go awry in individuals suffering from emotional disorders. Dr. Hay’s work encompasses clinical psychology as well as affective science.

Biography

Aleena Hay received her B.A. from Skidmore College and her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Yale University. She completed her pre-doctoral internship at the May Institute, where she focused on empirically supported outpatient treatment for children, adolescents, and adults with complex psychopathology. Dr. Hay completed her postdoctoral fellowship at the Boston University Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders (CARD). At Moravian University, Dr. Hay teaches a number of courses, including Abnormal Psychology / Psychopathology, Emotion, and Experimental Methods and Data Analysis I and II.

Selected Publications

Hay, A. C., Sheppes, G., Gross, J. J., & Gruber, J. (2015). Choosing how to feel: Emotion regulation choice in bipolar disorder. Emotion, 15, 139-145.

Hofmann, S. G., Hay, A. C. (2018). Rethinking avoidance: Toward a balanced approach to avoidance in treating anxiety disorders. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 55, 14-21. 

Barthel, A. L., Hay, A. Doan, S.N., & Hofmann, S. G. (2018). Interpersonal emotion regulation: a review of social and developmental components. Behavior Change, 35, 203-216.