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Moravian College
Sociology and Anthropology

Daniel Jasper, Associate Professor and Department Chair

Dr. Jasper is a cultural sociologists who focuses on religious and political identity in western India.  His work investigates how the past is remembered and celebrated as a means to articulate meaningful identities in the present.

Office location: PPHAC 316
Office phone: 610-625-7882
Email: jasperd@moravian.edu

Education

Ph.D., Sociology, New School for Social Research
M.A., Sociology (with Highest Honors), New School for Social Research
B.A., Sociology (cum laude), Macalester College  

Selected Publications:

Books

co-editor with Dušan Deák, Rethinking Western India: The Changing Contexts of Culture, Society and Religion. Orient BlackSwan. ISBN: 978-81-250-5582-2

Articles & Chapters

Forthcoming: “Maratha Rule (1674-1818).” In Oxford Bibliographies in Hinduism. Ed. Tracy Coleman. New York: Oxford University Press, forthcoming.

“Blurred Lines: Historical Knowledge and the Politics of Statues” in Bina Sengar and Laurie McMillen (Eds) Spaces and Places in Western India: Formations and Delineations.  Routledge, forthcoming.

with Kelly Denton-Borhaug, “Memoir as Contemplative Practice for Peace and Justice”. International Journal of Critical Pedagogy (2014) 5:2.

with Dušan Deák, “Introduction: The Semantics and Mechanics of Region—Maharashtra and its Contexts” in Rethinking Western India: The Changing Contexts of Culture, Society and Religion. Orient BlackSwan, 2014.

“Of Relics and Living Traditions: Creating Heritage in Maharashtra” in Deák and Jasper (Eds.) Rethinking Western India: The Changing Contexts of Culture, Society and Religion.  Orient BlackSwan, 2014.

“Celebrating a Region Through Historical Commemoration”  Anne Feldhaus and Rajendra Vora (Eds.) Region, Culture and Politics in India.  Delhi: Manohar, 2006.

“Commemorating the ‘Golden Age’ of Shivaji in Maharashtra, India and the Development of Maharashtrian Public Politcs” Journal of Political and Military Sociology, special issue on the Politics of Commemoration, 31:2 (Winter 2003) 215-230.