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March 26, 2020

Publications

Colleen Payton, assistant professor in Moravian College’s public health program, was published in the March/April 2020 issue of the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. Her paper, “Designing and Evaluating a Prediabetes Shared Decision Aid.”

From The Abstract:

Background: Prediabetes is increasing in prevalence and is associated with risk of developing diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and retinopathy. Clinicians have limited tools to facilitate prediabetes discussions within primary care visits.

Purpose: 1) Develop a Patient and Stakeholder Advisory Committee (PASAC) to design, evaluate, and revise a prediabetes shared decision aid, and 2) evaluate the feasibility and experience of implementing the tool within primary care practice.


Professor of Economics and Business Eva Leeds’s piece “Tokyo 2020: Public Cost and Private Benefit,” appears in the March 1, 2020 issue of the Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus. Her article is part of a special Issue: Japan’s Olymic Summer Games—Past and Present, Part II.

The Abstract

The IOC’s myopic push for increasingly elaborate Olympics increased the size of the Olympics and raised the staging costs, which outpaced revenue and discouraged bidders. As the Olympics have become very costly mega events, only rich megacities like Tokyo can afford to host them. Advocates of the Olympics remain convinced that the Olympic expenditure is an investment that the city will ultimately recoup, but this is unlikely. For construction companies, however, the games are a bonanza.



Chris Jones, professor of biology, participated in a consortium of faculty from 96 colleges and universities across the country that examined how to improve student experience and understanding of undergraduate scientific research. Their work, “Facilitating Growth through Frustration: Using Genomics Research in a Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experience,” appeared in the February 2020 issue of the Journal of Microbiology and Biology Education.

The Abstract

A hallmark of the research experience is encountering difficulty and working through those challenges to achieve success. This ability is essential to being a successful scientist, but replicating such challenges in a teaching setting can be difficult. The Genomics Education Partnership (GEP) is a consortium of faculty who engage their students in a genomics Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE). Students participate in genome annotation, generating gene models using multiple lines of experimental evidence. Our observations suggested that the students' learning experience is continuous and recursive, frequently beginning with frustration but eventually leading to success as they come up with defendable gene models. In order to explore our "formative frustration" hypothesis, we gathered data from faculty via a survey, and from students via both a general survey and a set of student focus groups. Upon analyzing these data, we found that all three datasets mentioned frustration and struggle, as well as learning and better understanding of the scientific process. Bioinformatics projects are particularly well suited to the process of iteration and refinement because iterations can be performed quickly and are inexpensive in both time and money. Based on these findings, we suggest that a dynamic of "formative frustration" is an important aspect for a successful CURE.


The article “Twenty-First-Century Climate Education: Developing Diverse, Confident, and Competent Leaders in Environmental Sustainability,” co-authored by Diane Husic, dean of the school of natural and health sciences and professor of biology, appeared in February 2020 in the online pre-publication version of the Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America.

The Abstract

With climate change impacting systems globally at alarming rates, the need for educating the next generation of environmental stewards is necessary. The Rocky Mountain Sustainability and Science Network (RMSSN) is an immersive field experience for undergraduate and graduate students interested in climate change and sustainability within National Parks. The program was established to educate and cultivate a diverse audience of future leaders, environmental guardians, and sustainability advocates with a focus on engaging underrepresented minorities (URM) in science. Participants were evaluated through efficacy instruments and focus groups to determine how a short‐term research experience could impact a student's future outlook and perceived ability to impact science and sustainability. Findings indicate URM, and majority students were more confident in their abilities, and more motivated to continue within their studies. RMSSN provides a framework that is translatable to other field‐based curriculums. This paper addresses specific engagement mechanisms for educating future science leaders.

March 12, 2020

New Book from Joyce Hinnefeld

English professor Joyce Hinnefeld’s latest book, The Beauty of Their Youth, has just been released from the Wolfson Press prestigious American Storytellers Series. The five short stories in this collection question the reliability of memory, how our history impinges on our present, or what risks are worth taking, but each captures moments in people’s lives when they are vulnerable. A book launch is scheduled for March 17 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Bethlehem Area Public Library, 11 W. Church Street, featuring Hinnefeld in conversation with local novelist Kate Racculia. A public discussion and book signing will follow. Details here.

Dunn Pens Book Chapter

Dana S. Dunn, professor of psychology, and his frequent collaborator, Jane S. Halonen (University of West Florida) have a chapter in the second edition of Critical Thinking in Psychology,  edited by Robert Sternberg (Cornell University) and Diane Halpern (Emerita, Claremont McKenna College). Halonen and Dunn's chapter is titled "Critical Thinking: Promise, Progress, and Paradox." The book was published by Cambridge University Press.

Dunn Delivers Keynote, Attends Psychology Conference

Dana S. Dunn, professor of psychology, gave an afternoon keynote address at the Teaching Preconference prior to the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) in New Orleans on Thursday, February 27. Dunn spoke on "Advisor or Impostor? A Social Psychology of Mentoring Students." Dunn's talk was sponsored by Worth/Macmillan Publishers.

In addition Dunn attended the annual Mid-Winter Rehabilitation Psychology Meeting in San Diego from February 19—23. More than 280 rehabilitation psychologists participated in the conference, which was held in San Diego's Gaslamp District. As President of Division 22 (Rehabilitation Psychology) of the American Psychological Association from August 2019 to August 2020, Dunn chaired a meeting of the Executive Committee, attended board meetings, spoke in a panel session, judged graduate student posters, and welcomed colleagues to the conference, among other duties.

The Latest from Our Columnists

Gary Olson, professor emeritus of political science, penned the column "Big Pharma Poised to Cash in on COVID-19" for the March 1, 2020, edition of the Smirking Chimp.

January, February 2020

Aguilar Publishes Research on Food and Culture in Mexico

Sandra Aguilar, associate professor of history, published an article that explores the consumption of wheat bread and cakes, the values identified with these foodstuffs, and how changes in eating practices were propelled in mid-twentieth-century Mexico. This article is part of a special issue on food cultural studies in the transatlantic world.

Aguilar Rodríguez, Sandra. “Las penas con pan son menos’: Race, Modernity and Wheat in Modern Mexico." Bulletin of Spanish Studies, 87:1 (2020).

Terrizzi Publishes Two Papers

Associate Professor of Economics Sabrina Terrizzi’s article "Estimating the Price Elasticity of Switching Between Branding and Generic Drugs," was recently published in the journal Contemporary Economic Policy. Her piece “Taking the CON out of PA: Did Hip and Knee Replacement Patients Benefit?  A Retrospective Analysis,” appeared in the December 2019 issue of Health Policy and Technology.

Husic Presents at NCSE Conference and COP25

Diane Husic, dean of the school of natural and health sciences and professor of biology serves on the Leaders’ Alliance Executive Committee of the National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE). In January, Husic; Natasha Woods, assistant professor of biology; and Kate Brandes, adjunct professor of geology attended the NCSE annual conference in Washington, D.C. where Husic gave a presentation and moderated two panel sessions:

Organizer, moderator and presenter, NCSE panel, Crossing the Abyss: The Value of Working at the Science-Policy Interface, January 7, 2020.

Invited moderator, NCSE flask talk session, Exploring the Science-Policy Interface, January 7, 2020.

At COP25 (the U.N. Climate Conference) held in Madrid, Spain (December 1 - 13), Husic was a faculty mentor as part of an NSF workshop titled "International Climate Science and Diplomacy," which included faculty and students from Colorado State, Clark, Vanderbilt, Michigan Tech, Monash (Australia) Universities, Connecticut University, and Colorado and Moravian Colleges. Additionally, Husic gave two presentations at COP25:

Organizer, moderator and presenter, COP25 Side-event (peer-reviewed) panel titled “Contribution of Higher Education to Climate Action and the Implementation of the Paris Agreement,” December 3, 2019, Madrid, Spain.

Invited panel discussant: COP25 event at the Bangladesh Pavilion titled “Universities as knowledge Brokers in the Governance of Climate Change,” December 3, 2019, Madrid, Spain.

Shorr’s Prometheus/Redux Wins Best Play

Prometheus/Redux, written by Geral Stropnicky and directed by Christopher Shorr, artistic director of the Moravian College Theatre Company, won best original play in the professional theater category in the 14th annual ABE awards for theater in the Lehigh Valley.

Marabella to Participate in TEDX Talk

Santo D. Marabella, professor of management will join other speakers at the talk “Always/Never; Sometimes/Maybe” hosted by TEDxLehighRiver on March 10, 2020, at PBS39 in Bethlehem.

Recent articles from Gary Olson, emeritus professor of political science:

Still Waiting for (Lefty) Godot,” Dissident Voice, December 20, 2019.

The Serious Left and Bernie Sanders in 2020,” Dissident Voice, January 9, 2020.

148 Seconds of Music that Helped Midwife a Cultural Revolution,” High Plains Reader, January 15, 2020

Gerencher's Work in Sky & Telescope Magazine

Joseph Gerencher, Emeritus Professor of Earth Science, has contributed to an article that appears in the February 2020 issue of Sky & Telescope magazine. The publication also links to Gerencher’s website where he describes building a solar spectrograph

December 2019

SLP Faculty and Students Present Research at SLP Convention

All faculty in Moravian College’s Speech-Language Pathology (SLP) Program and some of our students presented research at the American Speech-Language Hearing Association’s Annual Convention, held from November 21-23 in Orlando, Florida. Drawing roughly 15,000 attendees annually, the convention is the premier professional education event for speech-language pathologists, audiologists, and speech, language, and hearing scientists.

Graduate student Estrella Sosa and undergraduate health science students Toshiana Figureoa ’20 and Mikayla Jucewicz ’20 presented two posters under the guidance of Monica Kaniamattam, assistant professor of speech-language pathology. Their research:

  • “Noise Exposure & Hearing Conservation Among LVAIC College Students”
  • “’I know, but I don't care!’ A Mixed-Methods Study of Young Adults Hearing Conservation Practices”

Kaniamattam herself gave additional presentations on participatory action research for school based SLPs.

Louise Keegan, associate professor and program director speech-language pathology, presented her research related to group treatment for communication difficulties after brain injury, and she spoke on teaching and learning in the field of communication sciences and disorders. 

Susana Keller, clinical coordinator and assistant professor of speech-language pathology, addressed the SLP’s role in cases of clients with poor prognosis. She also presented reasearch that examined the process of assessing clinical readiness across clinical professions.

Eric Sanders, assistant professor of speech-language pathology, presented on the characteristics of SLPs who self-identify as Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) specialists in education settings. AAC is any form of communication other than spoken language used to express thoughts, needs, wants, and ideas.

Dunn Conducts Academic Program Review

Dana S. Dunn, professor of psychology, recently conducted an academic program review of the department of psychology at the College of Staten Island. Dunn did the campus visit and review with a colleague from Ithaca College. Psychology is currently the largest major at the College of Staten Island.

The Practical Prof’s Latest Column

Professor of Economics Santo D. Marabella’s latest piece for the Reading Eagle, “Making Recognition Meaningful,” appeared on November 19.

November 2019

Fraleigh’s Work Featured In Multiple Venues

“Sound the Deep Waters,” a collection of paintings by Angela Fraleigh, associate professor and chair of the art department, is on exhibit at the Delaware Art Museum in Wilmington, Delaware, through April 12, 2020.

Rosen “Does Battle” at International Conference

Joel Nathan Rosen, associate professor of sociology and anthropology, was an invited panelist at two sessions of the annual Battle of Ideas festival in London, November 2-3. The international conference brings together more than 450 speakers for over 100 debates on questions such as “Snowflakes or Revolutionaries: What is the New Student Identity?” “Is Socialism Making a Comeback?” “Hungary: the Bad Boy of Europe?” “How Do We Solve a Problem Like the Climate Emergency?” “Genome Editing: Do We Need Global Regulation?” “Who Are ‘The People’?”

Keegan and Benham Present at Preeminent Rehabilitation Research Conference

Louise Keegan, program director, speech-language pathology, and Sara Benham, assistant professor of occupational therapy, attended the 2019 annual conference of the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine held November 5-8 in Chicago. Drawing more than 2,500 physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech language pathologists, physicians, neuropsychologists, and rehabilitation scientists, it is the largest rehabilitation research conference in the world.

Rosen Invited to Speak at University of the West of Scotland

Joel Nathan Rosen, associate professor of sociology and anthropology and author of the book From New Lanark to Mound Bayou, was invited to the University of West Scotland to speak about the journey of Owen’s ideas across the Atlantic, where they eventually reached Mississippi plantation owner Joseph E. Davis. Inspired by Owen’s model, Davis constructed a similar community of slaves that significantly increased productivity on the plantation and economic gain for Davis. Rosen further traces the community’s evolution as ownership of the plantation fell to slave Benjamin T. Montgomery after the Civil War and then as former slaves became residents of Mound Bayou, an entirely African-American town, founded by Montgomery’s son Isaiah.

Dunn Recognized by APA

Dana S. Dunn, professor of psychology, recently participated in the Fall Consolidated Meetings at the American Psychological Association (APA) in Washington, DC. Dunn completed his three-year term on the Board of Educational Affairs (BEA), where he spent his efforts advancing educational issues for associate and baccalaureate education in psychology. To acknowledge his efforts, the APA gave him two engraved Jefferson cups, one for his work on the BEA and the other for his leadership of the 2019 Education and Training Awards Committee.

Olsen’s Latest Opinion Piece

Professor Emeritus of Political Science Gary Olsen’s piece “The Empire, Trump, and Intra-Ruling Class Conflict,” appeared in the November 7, 2019, issue of City Watch. And in the November 2, 2019 issue of Dissident Voice.

October 2019

Frances Irish, Co-Author of Journal Article on Piranhas

Frances Irish, associate professor of biology, is co-author with researchers from the University of Washington for the paper “Tooth and Consequences: Heterodonty and Dental Replacement in Piranhas and Pacus (Serrasalmidae),” which appeared in the August 26, 2019 issue of the journal Evolution & Development. Teeth are a necessary anatomical tool of the carnivorous piranha, which also uses its dentition to  scrape the plants they eat off of rocks. It’s not too surprising then that piranhas need to keep their teeth razor sharp. They do so by losing and replacing their teeth regularly throughout their lifetime. Using imaging technologies, the researchers have shown that piranhas shed all the teeth on one side of their mouth at a time. Irish contributed scanning electron micrographs from previous research that looked, in part, at feeding mechanisms of piranhas.

Rehab Sciences Group Awarded Grant

Faculty from Moravian College’s rehabilitation sciences programs in physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech language pathology received a national grant for their project “Participation of students with disabilities on school trips: Parent experiences and perceptions” from the American Physical Therapy Association's Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy. “This demonstrates the strength of our inter-professional education plan in the department,” says Jay Scifers, chair of the department of rehabilitation sciences.

Husic Elected to Board

Diane Husic, dean of the school of natural and health sciences and professor of biology, was recently elected to the board of Hawk Mountain Sanctuary in Kempton, Pennsylvania. “This is a real honor!” says Husic.

Dunn Acknowledged for Work on APA Publication

Dana S. Dunn, professor of psychology, received a thank you from the American Psychological Association for his contributions to the revision effort for the new seventh edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. Dunn was acknowledged for his expertise in writing about disability without bias. Chapter 5 in the new manual features bias-free language guidelines that help to ensure inclusive scholarly writing. The manual is used by undergraduates, graduate students, scholar-researchers, educators, and writers in psychology and many other fields within the social and health sciences. 

Husic Facilitates Conferences

Diane Husic, dean of the school of natural and health sciences and professor of biology, recently facilitated the 15th NCAA Division II Faculty Athletics Representative Fellows Leadership Institute. Husic has been involved with this national leadership initiative since its first inception.

Currently, Husic is helping facilitate a multi-institution workshop funded by the National Science Foundation titled "Collaborative Research Workshop: Engaging students in science international decision making," which will be held at the Colorado State University Mountaintop Campus. This is in preparation for COP25 (the UN climate meetings), which will be held in Chile this year.

The Latest Columns from the Practical Prof

Professor of Management Santo D. Marabella’s column “Stop Scaring Your Workers” appeared in the October 14, 2019, issue of the Reading Eagle. Marabella’s column “Fear Can’t Work in a Productive Workplace,” appeared on October 22, 2019.

Dunn Co-Edits Special Issue of JSI

Dana S. Dunn, professor of psychology at Moravian, and colleague Kathleen Bogart, associate professor of psychology at Oregon State University, spent the last year and a half producing a special issue of the Journal of Social Issues (JSI) on ableism. Ableism refers to prejudice and discrimination aimed at disabled individuals by nondisabled individuals. The issue was published on September 23, 2019. This is the first issue on #disability in 31 years, topics include implicit and explicit, hostile and benevolent ableism, microagressions, violence toward disabled people, disability identity, disclosure, and allyship. 

Riopel Awarded Fellowship

Mary Anne Riopel, program director and associate professor of the Moravian College Physical Therapy Program, was accepted into the American Physical Therapy Association Educational Leadership Institute Fellowship. There are 21 fellows nationally. “As a 2019-2020 fellow, I am participating in a 52-week curriculum designed to develop ‘innovative, influential, and visionary leaders who can function in a rapidly evolving politico-sociocultural environment.’”

Potter Selected to Leadership Institute

Ann Marie Potter, program director and assistant professor of the Moravian College Occupational Therapy Program was accepted to American Occupational Therapy Association's Academic Leadership Institute. This is a year-long program focused on developing academic leadership goals. “In the institute, we are learning about leadership styles, the state of higher education, guiding change in higher education, research program development, promoting diversity and ethics,” says Potter. About 30 participants are selected through a competitive application process. This is the 3rd year, AOTA has sponsored the institute.

Amin’s Work Displayed in Solo Exhibition

The Cue Art Foundation in New York City is presenting “Hyphen,” a solo exhibition of work by Natessa Amin, Moravian College Visiting Artist. As described on Cue’s website: “Amin creates a site-specific mixed-media installation that brings together painting, sculpture, and drawing to explore the artist’s experience of embodying a hybrid identity. Binding all of these materials together is a long undulating trail of hand-dyed newsprint that curves around the gallery’s walls, forming a textural structure within which individual objects become intertwined as part of a larger sculptural body.

New Recordings from Lipkis

Three new recordings by Larry Lipkis, composer-in-residence, have been recently released: Chamber Music, The Juniper Tree, and Food of Love: Songs, Dances, and Fancies for Shakespeare.

Fraleigh To Paint Poet’s Portrait

The Bethlehem Area Public Library has commissioned Angela Fraleigh, associate professor and chair of the art department, to paint a portrait of the renowned poet and Bethlehem native Hilda Doolittle, better known as H.D. The portrait is scheduled to be completed by the end of this year and will hang permanently in the Main Library at West Church Street. Stay tuned for the unveiling of Fraleigh’s work.

Dunn Speaks at ICPM Conference

Dana S. Dunn, professor of psychology, recently spoke at the 25th World Congress of the International College of Psychosomatic Medicine in Florence, Italy. This year's theme was "The Psychosomatic Perspective." Along with Barry Nierenberg, professor of psychology with Nova Southeastern University; Stephen Wegener, professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation at Johns Hopkins University; and Dan Rohe, psychologist with the Mayo Clinic, Dunn gave a symposium on “Living the Good Life with a Disability: The Foundational Principles of Rehabilitation Psychology.”

Payne Completes Leadership Certificate

Ellen Payne, assistant professor of athletic training, completed the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Leadership Development Certificate.

Dunn Conducts Program Review

Dana S. Dunn, professor of psychology, recently conducted an academic program review of the Department of Psychology at Hamilton College in Clinton, New York. Dunn and two colleagues, one from the College of Wooster and the other from Bates College, reviewed the program's curriculum, staffing, service, and scholarship requirements, and they answered questions about best practices for undergraduate departments of psychology. This review was Dunn's since 49th since 2002.

Gray Pens Op-Ed on Nurse Practitioners

Assistant Professor and Director of Moravian College’s Nurse Practitioner Programs, Kathleen Gray’s op-ed piece on nurse practitioners appeared in the October 3, 2019, edition of the Morning Call.

The Latest from Our Columnists

Professor of Management Santo D. Marabella’s column “Being Creative when You’re Not Creative” appeared in the September 21, 2019, issue of the Reading Eagle.

Gary Olson, professor emeritus of political science, penned the column “In Intra-Elite Battle, Dems Prefered the ’Stache [John Bolton] to the Donald” for the September 14, 2019, edition of the Smirking Chimp.