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Moravian College
Philosophy

Fall 2019 COURSES

The following courses are offered during the Fall 2019 semester.  Please view the Moravian College Course Catalog for a complete listing of the Philosophy Department course offerings.

Fall 2019 Schedule

Course Code Title Instructor Days Start Time End Time LinC
PHIL 110 A Introduction to Logic Cantens M, W 10:20 am 11:30 am   M3
PHIL 120 A Introduction to Philosophy Niemoczynski M, W 8:55 am  10:05 am  M3
PHIL 120 B Introduction to Philosophy Niemoczynski M, W 1:10 pm 2:20 pm  M3
PHIL 194 OL ST: Philosophy of Human Experience Cantens   on-line    
PHIL 222 A Ethics Moeller T, R 1:10 pm 2:20 pm  M3
PHIL 222 B Ethics Moeller T, R 2:35 pm  3:45 pm   M3
PHIL 226 2 A Ethics Bowl Naraghi T 2:35 pm 3:45 pm  
PHIL 227 2 A Ethics Bowl Naraghi M, W 2:35 pm 3:45 pm  
PHIL 228 A Sports Ethics Niemoczynski M, W 2:35 pm 3:45 pm  M3
PHIL 245 A Early Modern Philosophy Cantens M, W 1:10 pm 2:20 pm  M3
PHIL 279 A Philosophy of Law Naraghi T, R 11:45 am 12:55 pm  U2
PHIL 281 A Topics Ethics: Diversity/Soc Justice Moeller T, R 10:20 am 11:30 am  M3
PHIL 281 B Topics Ethics: Business/Virtue Ethic Naraghi T, R 1:10 pm 2:20 pm  M3

100-Level Courses

PHIL 110 A: Introduction to Logic: Critical Thinking

An introduction of the basic concepts of logic, informal fallacies and categorical logic. (M3) Fall, Cantens.

PHIL 120 A & 120 B: Introduction to Philosophy

Tasks and the subject matters of philosophy, including the major theories of reality, knowledge, religion, morality and social justice. Attention to several classic philosophical texts as primary sourse readings. (M3) Semester, Cantens, Naraghi, Staff.

PHIL 194 OL: ST: Philosophy of Human Experience

This course examines the philosophy of human experience through various perspectives including the meaning of life, theories of reality, the existence of God, theories of knowledge, morality and social justice issues. 

200-Level Courses

PHIL 222 A & 222 B: Ethics

Formulating principles defining the good human being and to applying these to relevant problems of vocation and social and political justice. (M3) Fall, Moeller, Cantens and Staff.

PHIL 226 2 A: Ethics Bowl

This course examines, within teams, ethical cases with the purpose of developing ethical positions supported by arguments, debated at the Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl Competition.  Fall, Cantens, Naraghi and Staff. Prerequisite: PHIL 222 or PHIL 224 or permission of the instructor.

PHIL 227 2 A: Ethics Bowl

This course examines, within teams, ethical cases with the purpose of developing ethical positions supported by arguments, debated at the Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl Competition.  Fall, Cantens, Naraghi and Staff. Prerequisite: PHIL 222 or PHIL 224 or permission of the instructor.

PHIL 228 A: Sports Ethics

This course introduces students to ethical concepts, theories, and methods through which they can reflectively analyze and perform ethical decision making in the realm of sports and recreation, within an evolving cultural, political and technological environment.  A substantial part of the course will be devoted to case studies and the implementation of ethical theories to concrete cases. Cantens, Niemoczynski

PHIL  245: Early Modern Philosophy

A study of the development of important concepts of modern philosophy beginning with Beacon, Descartes and Locke, and ending with Kant and Hegel.  It examines and evaluates the modern period's turn to study of knowledge and its increasing preference for reason and science over religion. (M3) Fall, Alternate Year, Cantens.

PHIL 279 A: Philosophy of Law

Philosophy of law or jurisprudence is the application of the rational techniques of the discipline of a philosophy to the subject matter of law.  In this course, on one the one hand, students study the meaning of law, legal obligation, legal punishment, and so on.  (What is known as analytic jurisprudence.)  They also explore the relation between law and morality, or more specifically, they try to figure out whether legal institutions in general, or particular legal systems, or legal practices are morally acceptable, and if they are, how to make them so.  (What is known as normative jurisprudence.) (U2) Naraghi.

PHIL 281 A: Topics Ethics: Diversity/SOC Justice

Topics in Ethics: Virtue Ethics and Social Political Justice in Bio-Ethics A Study of health, and how it relates to social justice issues from a virtue ethics perspective.  We will focus on issues of disability, race, sexuality, sex, gender identity, religion, national status as documented or not, global issues, and other issues related to injustice, and virtue ethics as an approach to social justice. (M3) Moeller.

PHIL 281 B: Topics Ethics: Business/Virtue Ethic

Topics in Ethics: Business and Virtue Ethics Business and Virtue Ethics will explore the moral aspects of business and management from a virtue ethics perspective. The purpose of this course is to help students improve their ability to make ethical decisions in business by providing them with a framework that they can use to identify, analyze, and resolve ethical issues in business decision making.  In this course, we explore topics such as, the ethics of corporate downsizing, some paradoxes of whistleblowing, drug testing in employment, ethics of sales, ethics of manipulative advertising, and the like.  In addition to these selected topics, we are going to discuss some more general topics, such as the meaning of virtue ethics, business ethics, the moral responsibilities of businessmen, and the relation between business and environmental ethics. (M3) Naraghi.